Report: Player ‘unwilling’ to extend contract and could leave Man Utd as club eye £43m deal

Paul Pogba has an uncertain future at Manchester United as his contract is up in 2022 and the Telegraph say he’s ‘unwilling’ to extend it amid interest from Paris Saint-Germain.

The 28-year-old returned to Old Trafford from Juventus in 2016 and went on to make 199 appearances in all competitions, scoring 38 goals with 45 assists, but he may have played his final game.

PSG want to bring Pogba back to France and are willing to pay £43m for his signature, but the Telegraph say United want a minimum of £50m before they consider accepting.

The Daily Mail say the Red Devils have tried to tie Pogba down to a new deal and offered him £350k-a-week/£18.2m-a-year, which is £60k-per-week/£3.1m-a-year more than his existing contract, but he’s not prepared to agree.

Agent Mino Raiola has been in talks with PSG about Pogba’s personal terms, so a move appears to be in the offing. United will be left with Nemanja Matic, Scott McTominay, Donny van der Beek, Fred and Bruno Fernandes, so they might scour the transfer market for his replacement.

One player they’re keen on is Eduardo Camavinga of Rennes, but latest reports suggest he may favour a move to Spain amid interest from Real Madrid. The 18-year-old wonderkid is out of contract in 2022 and doesn’t appear to be staying in France.

Rennes are willing to sell him for €30m (£25.7m) rather than losing him for nothing next summer, but it remains to be seen if United can beat Real to his signature.

PSG’s pursuit of Pogba comes from desperation to win back the Ligue 1 title and go all the way in the Champions League. They’ve heavily strengthened this summer – Achraf Hakimi from Inter Milan, Danilo Pereira from FC Porto, Georginio Wijnaldum from Liverpool, Sergio Ramos from Real Madrid and Gianluigi Donnarumma from AC Milan – so Mauricio Pochettino has no excuse not to deliver.

Pogba joining the Parisians would arguably make them the strongest side in Europe, but he’s still a United player as things stand.